EngineeringUK

Media release - 19/2/2009

New research illustrates many careers advisors and teachers are not well informed about apprenticeships

The ETB has today released preliminary research which illustrates that careers advisors, teachers and other education professionals are not sufficiently informed about apprenticeships. Education professionals - alongside students and parents – must therefore be at the heart of Government support, intervention and information during National Apprenticeship week:

The research, entitled, Engineers and Engineering Brand Monitor, reveals that:
• 55% of education professionals (careers advisors, teachers, tutors and lecturers) believe a degree is the minimum qualification required for a career in engineering, and are apparently unaware of apprenticeships.
• 39 % of education professionals believe a physics qualification is necessary for a career in engineering (which it isn’t for apprenticeships)
• Only 1 % of education professionals claim to very knowledgeable about chemical engineering
• Only 4% of education professionals claim to be very knowledgeable about civil engineering
• Over a quarter of education professionals associated engineering with ‘men’, ‘males’ and being ‘male dominated’.
The report concludes that many teachers and careers advisors have a limited understanding of the everyday work of engineers, and this leads to a gap between what they communicate to young people, and the reality of the profession.
In order to address this issue, the ETB proposes:
• Targeted intervention to ensure all education professionals from teachers to careers advisors are well informed about engineering apprenticeships and other pathways into engineering
• Consistent, targeted and age-appropriate careers information, advice and guidance for all students at all secondary schools

Paul Jackson, Chief Executive of the ETB, said: ‘Despite the fact that the average person comes into contact with dozens of pieces of technology every day before work, many teachers, careers advisors, parents and other influencers have a limited understanding of the everyday work of engineers, and this leads to a gap between what they communicate to young people, and the opportunities of the profession.’

‘Engineering apprenticeships provide a flexible and accessible pathway into what is a diverse and rewarding career. We can and must work together to support education professionals in ensuring young people are fully aware of this.’

Notes to Editors
 As part of the research in a total of 862 telephone interviews were conducted, of which of which 101 ere with education professionals

For further information please contact:
Laura Marsh, PR and Communications Manager EngineeringUK
Tel: 020 3206 0444 or (m) 07887 943 017